Friday, May 26, 2017

Repaved Sawyer Camp Trail to Reopen Saturday Morning, May 27

The Sawyer Camp Trail's newly repaved southern half will reopen tomorrow morning, Saturday, May 27. We'll be closing it again for one more weekday some time later in June to paint the center stripe. Signs will be posted in advance at the trail entrances.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission has repaved the trail’s entire southern half and, in partnership with the San Mateo County Parks Department, restored the adjoining shoulders with new gravel.  

Our thanks to the  Sawyer Camp Trail family for the patience and support!

Friday, May 19, 2017

Sawyer Camp Trail South Half Still Closed--Looking for an Alternative?

The southern half of the Sawyer Camp Trail is still closed for repaving, this weekend and through May 26, from the Skyline entrance to the Jepsen Laurel. So check out the San Andreas Trail instead.

A short 0.7-mile unpaved section just to the north of the Sawyer Camp Hillcrest entrance takes you to Larkspur Lane and the entrance to the approximately two-mile paved trail past the San Andreas Reservoir to  San Bruno Avenue. 

The northern half of the Sawyer Camp Trail is also open, from the Hillcrest entrance to the Jepsen Laurel.

On the Sawyer Camp Trail, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is repaving the surface of the entire southern half, and restoring the shoulders. It will reopen for the Memorial Day weekend.  

Friday, May 12, 2017

Sawyer Camp Trail South Half to Close for Repaving May15 - 26

The southern half of the Sawyer Camp Trail will be closed for repaving for about 3-1/2 miles, from the Crystal Springs entrance to the Jepson Laurel every day, May 15 – 26, including the weekend of May 20-21. 

The northern half, from the Hillcrest entrance to the Jepson Laurel, will be open every day. 

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission will repave the surface of the entire southern half of the trail, and restore the adjoining shoulders. 

The trail may also be closed for one more weekday some time after the Memorial Day weekend so that crews can finish painting the center stripe.  Signage will be posted in advance.

Bicyclists wanting through access should use alternative routes during this period. 

Thank you for your patience and support.  

Questions: (866) 973-1476; mliapes@sfwater.org; blauppe@sfwater.org


Friday, May 5, 2017

Trapping the Local Steelhead

It’s a gem of an urban creek with an endangered species running right through downtown.   

Biologists Scott Taylor (left) and Aaron Brinkerhoff discuss what's been trapped today.   

Any day—Monday through Sunday, rain or shine—one or more of our biologists will be out on San Mateo Creek with the trout.

The creek flows down to the bay from the Crystal Springs Reservoir through suburbs and downtown San Mateo as well as parts of the Peninsula Watershed. The SFPUC is dedicated to year-round restoration of both creek and critters that live there. We've been releasing small, prescribed amounts of water daily from Lower Crystal Springs Dam into the creek for habitat improvement since 2015, and lead biologist Aaron Brinkerhoff says conditions keep getting better.

These days, Brinkerhoff and team are trapping, then releasing, young so-called “steelhead"--the ones that migrate out to sea. (The rest in the same species are “residents," also known as “rainbow” trout. They'll stay in the fresh water of their birthplace all their lives.)

“This little urban creek is such a gem,” Brinkerhoff says.  “We have an endangered species running right through the neighborhoods."

The trap is set early each spring. That’s when the young steelhead—called smolt—enter certain physical changes that equip them for salt water. They’re now four to eight inches long, they’ve taken on  the silvery hue that distinguishes them from the residents, and they’re moving downstream. The hope is that they’ll survive the three years at sea and return home to spawn.

So any smolt happening into the trap is quickly and gently weighed, measured and implanted with an electronic tag for lifelong tracking. The young captives are kept in cool creek water during the process to minimize any stress before they’re released to continue on their way. “Even a small sample tells us a lot,” Brinkerhoff says. “Over time we’ll be able to see how the population is doing.

“This creek has a unique asset, and that’s our daily flow release. It’s like having a savings account of water.”